Coffee Roasting Is a Fun Business but What About The Neighbours?

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Coffee is the most consumed drink in the world. We drink a significant amount of coffee, not only in the morning but also during the day while socializing. According to British Coffee Association statistics, we drink approximately 98 million cups of coffee per day in England.

Coffee roasting is a fast developing market in the United Kingdom. There are around 600 large and small coffee roasters and new coffee roasters continue to pop up. While the industry is booming, it raises many problems with it.

To understand these problems, we need to know how coffee is produced.

The bright red fruits of the coffee tree are collected, immediately processed, and dried in the sun after processing. Before the coffee beans are exported, they are processed to remove the husk from them. During the process, the husk is removed, the beans are polished, they are separated according to their weight and size. Afterwards, the separated coffee is packaged and delivered to the roasters.

coffee beans

In the roasting process, the temperature is kept constant at about 280 degrees. The beans are mixed during the roasting process so that the beans do not burn. When the internal temperature of the coffee bean reaches 200 degrees, the coffee turns brown. The oil called CAFFEOL, which gives coffee that wonderful aroma and is stored in the bean, emerges at this temperature.

Of course, like every cooking process, there are VOCs and gases emitted by the coffee roasting process. Particulate matter (PM), volatile organic compounds (VOC), organic acids, and combustion products are the principal emissions from coffee processing. The roaster is the main source of gaseous pollutants, including alcohols, aldehydes, organic acids, and nitrogen and sulphur compounds. Because roasters are typically natural gas-fired, carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are expected as a result of fuel combustion. Decaffeination, instant coffee extraction and drying operations may also be sources of VOC. Coffee grounds can be captured with cyclones and these gases can be treated with a thermal oxidizer, but still the odour and smoke remain very uncomfortable for people living around a coffee roaster.

Coffee Roasting Odour and Smoke Control

In the roasting process, the temperature is kept constant at about 280 degrees. The beans are mixed during the roasting process so that the beans do not burn. When the internal temperature of the coffee bean reaches 200 degrees, the coffee turns brown. The oil called CAFFEOL, which gives coffee that wonderful aroma and is stored in the bean, emerges at this temperature.

Of course, like every cooking process, there are VOCs and gases emitted by the coffee roasting process. Particulate matter (PM), volatile organic compounds (VOC), organic acids, and combustion products are the principal emissions from coffee processing. The roaster is the main source of gaseous pollutants, including alcohols, aldehydes, organic acids, and nitrogen and sulphur compounds. Because roasters are typically natural gas-fired, carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are expected as a result of fuel combustion. Decaffeination, instant coffee extraction and drying operations may also be sources of VOC. Coffee grounds can be captured with cyclones and these gases can be treated with a thermal oxidizer, but still the odour and smoke remain very uncomfortable for people living around a coffee roaster.

No matter how pleasant it is to drink coffee, the burnt coffee odour and smoke are horrible. This problem may cause neighbours to be constantly complaining about businesses and businesses to be subject to sanctions by local authorities. Not to mention bad publicity.

A couple of months ago, odour complaints about a coffee roaster in Cornwall have appeared in the newspapers. Residents, living around the roastery were suffering daily from industrial noise and pungent fumes entering their homes. The residents’ group claims that people have been unable to sit outside or enjoy peace during the times that the roastery is operating.

Of course, there is a solution to this problem that will make both sides happy. An Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP)-based Ecology unit with ozone generator and ion technologies can easily be a solution to both eliminating odour and smoke and reducing emissions.

ESPs create an ionization field that will positively charge the grease, smoke and fine particulate in the exhaust. The positively charged particles then pass through collector plates which are alternately charged. The particulate is attracted to the negatively charged collection plates which capture the positive particles and hold them until they are washed off.

A well-designed ESP system provides odour and smoke control efficiency of almost 100%.

Coffee Roasting Odour and Smoke Control

• Completely eliminated Smoke & Odour complaints

• Reduced maintenance costs – Filters are not replaced, just cleaned.

• Warm, clean air can be recirculated, potentially reducing heating bills

• Filters fine particles down to sub-micron levels, which is better for pollution control

• Carbon filters are refilled, not replaced. 

• It’s a greener solution. Cells are cleaned and re-used, which keeps greasy, spent media filters from filling up landfills.

• Ecology Systems give businesses a clean image while complying with local legislation.

With proper care and maintenance, the ESP Ecology system will provide decades of highly efficient filtration in process air extractions. All things being considered, an ESP Ecology system is clearly one of the best options to use when a “Pollution Control Unit” is needed.

Grease Control
Smoke Control
Odour Control

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